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Heineken Prizes 2016 Winners

Charlene de Carvalho-Heineken presents Heineken Prizes for Science and Art

Charlene de Carvalho-Heineken presented the Heineken Prizes for Science and Art this afternoon to Jennifer Doudna, Stephen Jackson, Georgina Mace, Judith Herrin, Elizabeth Spelke and Yvonne Dröge Wendel.

The Heineken Prizes are the largest international research prizes in the Netherlands and are awarded every other year. The winners are selected by juries consisting of leading international researchers put together by the Academy.

The Heineken Prizes amount to USD 200,000 each. The Heineken Prize for Art consists of EUR 50,000 and EUR 50,000 to be spent on a publication or exhibition.

The Heineken Prizes are named after Dr Henry P. Heineken (1886-1971); Dr Alfred H. Heineken (1923-2002) and Charlene de Carvalho-Heineken (1954), chair of the Dr H.P. Heineken Foundation and the Alfred Heineken Fondsen Foundation, which finance the Heineken Prizes.

Heineken Prizes 2016 Winners

Left to right Elizabeth Spelke, Georgina Mace, Judith Herrin, Charlene de Carvalho-Heineken, Stephen Jackson, José van Dijck, Yvonne Dröge Wendel, Jennifer Doudna (Photo Frank van Beek) (Click the photo to enlarge)

 

Jennifer Doudna

Jennifer Doudna, Professor of Biomedical Sciences at the University of California, Berkeley (US), will receive the 2016 Dr H.P. Heineken Prize for Biochemistry and Biophysics for her pioneering research into the structure and functioning of RNA molecules and RNA protein complexes.
> Video
> Laudatio

 

Steve Jackson

Stephen (Steve) Jackson, Professor of Biology at the University of Cambridge (UK), will receive the 2016 Dr A.H. Heineken Prize for Medicine for his fundamental research into DNA repair in human cells and for the successful application of knowledge of that process in the development of new cancer drugs.
> Video
> Laudatio

 

Georgina Mace

Georgina Mace, Professor of Biodiversity and Ecosystems at University College London (UK), will receive the 2016 Dr A.H. Heineken Prize for Environmental Sciences for developing scientific criteria for the world’s most comprehensive list of threatened species and for establishing priorities for nature conservation.
> Video
> Laudatio

 

Judith Herrin

Judith Herrin, Emeritus Professor of Late Antique and Byzantine Studies at King’s College London (UK), will receive the 2016 Dr A.H. Heineken Prize for History for her groundbreaking research into Medieval cultures in Mediterranean civilisations and for establishing the crucial significance of the Byzantine Empire in history.
> Video
> Laudatio

 

Elizabeth Spelke

Elizabeth Spelke, Professor of Psychology at Harvard University, Cambridge (US), will receive the 2016 C.L. de Carvalho-Heineken Prize for Cognitive Sciences for her pioneering research into the cognitive development of infants.
> Video
> Laudatio

 

Yvonne Dröge Wendel

Dutch visual artist Yvonne Dröge Wendel was awarded the Dr A.H. Heineken Prize for Art 2016. The international jury has praised Wendel’s work for its originality, inventiveness and vitality.
> Video
> Laudatio

 

Heineken Young Scientist Awards

At the same event, the five Heineken Young Scientist Awards (EUR 10,000 each) were presented to five young Dutch researchers: microbiologist Edze Westra, biomedical scientist Mariëtte Boon, ecologist Wouter Halfwerk, historian Karwan Fatah-Black, and neuroscientist Jasper Poort.

The Heineken Young Scientists Awards offer encouragement to talented young researchers. They are awarded every other year to promising researchers whose outstanding work sets an example for others of their generation.

Heineken Young Scientists Awards 2016 Winners

Left to right José van Dijck, Edze Westra, Mariëtte Boon, Alexander de Carvalho,Karwan Fatah-Black, Louisa de Carvalho, Wouter Halfwerk, en Jasper Poort (Photo Frank van Beek) (Click the photo to enlarge)

 

Edze Westra, research fellow at the University of Exeter (United Kingdom)
Dr E.R. Westra (32) is receiving the 2016 Heineken Young Scientists Award for Biochemistry and Biophysics for his cross-disciplinary study of CRISPR-Cas, a natural adaptive immune system in bacteria.

Mariëtte Boon, researcher at Leiden University Medical Centre
Dr M.R. Boon (27) is receiving the 2016 Heineken Young Scientist Award for Medicine for her research on ‘brown fat’, a special type of fat cell that converts glucose and lipids into body heat.

Wouter Halfwerk, assistant professor at VU University Amsterdam
Dr W. Halfwerk (35) is receiving the 2016 Heineken Young Scientists Award for Environmental Sciences for his creative research on how humans alter communication between animals in nature.

Karwan Fatah-Black, assistant professor at Leiden University
Dr K.J. Fatah-Black (35) is receiving the 2016 Heineken Young Scientists Award for History for his study of Dutch formal and informal transatlantic trade in the Golden Age, especially the trade in slaves.

Jasper Poort, researcher at University College London
Dr J. Poort (33) is receiving the 2016 Heineken Young Scientists Award for Cognitive Sciences for his research on how our brain takes rapid decisions by focusing on the most important information available.

For more information about the Heineken Prizes, please visit www.knaw.nl/heinekenprizes or contact Irene van Houten, Communications Department Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, telephone +31 6 1137 5909.

Yvonne Dröge Wendel ontvangt de prestigieuze Dr. A.H. Heinekenprijs voor de Kunst 2016

Op donderdag 29 september 2016 reikt Charlene de Carvalho-Heineken de Dr. A.H. Heinekenprijs voor de Kunst 2016 uit. De laureaat is beeldend kunstenaar Yvonne Dröge Wendel. Zij ontvangt 100.000 euro, waarvan de helft is bestemd voor een publicatie en/of een tentoonstelling.
De prijs wordt dit jaar voor de vijftiende maal toegekend. De officiële ceremonie vindt plaats in de Beurs van Berlage te Amsterdam.
Bij die gelegenheid worden ook de vijf wetenschappelijke Heinekenprijzen uitgereikt en vijf prijzen voor jonge wetenschappers, die aan een Nederlandse onderzoeksinstelling promotieonderzoek hebben verricht.

Download persbericht (pdf)

Five exemplary researchers receive Heineken Young Scientists Awards

Talented young scientists receive Heineken Young Scientists Awards

The Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW) has announced the winners of the 2016 Heineken Young Scientists Awards. Each of the five recipients will receive EUR 10,000. Microbiologist Edze Westra, biomedical scientist Mariëtte Boon, ecologist Wouter Halfwerk, historian Karwan Fatah-Black, and neuroscientist Jasper Poort will be presented with their awards on Thursday 29 September at the Beurs van Berlage building in Amsterdam.

Heineken Young Scientists Award for Biochemistry and Biophysics: Edze Westra
Dr E.R. (Edze) Westra (32), research fellow at the University of Exeter (United Kingdom), is receiving the 2016 Heineken Young Scientists Award for Biochemistry and Biophysics for his cross-disciplinary study of CRISPR-Cas, a natural adaptive immune system in bacteria.

Heineken Young Scientists Award for Medicine: Mariëtte Boon
Dr M.R. (Mariëtte) Boon (27), researcher at Leiden University Medical Centre, is receiving the 2016 Heineken Young Scientist Award for Medicine for her research on ‘brown fat’, a special type of fat cell that converts glucose and lipids into body heat.

Heineken Young Scientists Award for Environmental Sciences: Wouter Halfwerk
Dr W. (Wouter) Halfwerk (35), assistant professor at VU University Amsterdam, is receiving the 2016 Heineken Young Scientists Award for Environmental Sciences for his creative research on how humans alter communication between animals in nature.

Heineken Young Scientists Award for History: Karwan Fatah-Black
Dr K.J. (Karwan) Fatah-Black (35), assistant professor at Leiden University, is receiving the 2016 Heineken Young Scientists Award for History for his study of Dutch formal and informal transatlantic trade in the Golden Age, especially the trade in slaves.

Heineken Young Scientists Award for Cognitive Sciences: Jasper Poort
Dr J. (Jasper) Poort (33), researcher at University College London, is receiving the 2016 Heineken Young Scientists Award for Cognitive Sciences for his research on how our brain takes rapid decisions by focusing on the most important information available.

The Heineken Young Scientists Awards offer important encouragement to talented young scientists who set an example for other young researchers and scientists. On 30 March, the Academy announced the winner of the Dr A.H. Heineken Prize for Art (EUR 50,000 in cash plus EUR 50,000 for a sculpture, a publication and/or an exhibition). On 10 May, the Academy announced the five winners of the Heineken Prizes (USD 200,000 each) for outstanding Dutch and foreign researchers.

Awards ceremony
The 2016 Heineken Young Scientists Awards will be presented on Thursday 29 September during an extraordinary meeting of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences at the Beurs van Berlage building in Amsterdam. The Heineken Prizes will be presented on the same occasion.

About the Heineken Young Scientists Awards
The Heineken Young Scientists Awards offer encouragement to talented young researchers. They are awarded every other year to promising researchers whose outstanding work sets an example for others of their generation. The winners work in the same disciplines as the Heineken Prize laureates and are selected by the same international juries assembled by the Academy. The Heineken Young Scientists Awards consist of a work of art designed by Jeroen Henneman (Amsterdam) and EUR 10,000.

About the Heineken Prizes
The Heineken Prizes are the most prestigious international science prizes of the Netherlands. They are awarded every other year. They are named after Dr Henry P. Heineken (1886-1971); Dr Alfred H. Heineken (1923-2002) and Charlene de Carvalho-Heineken (1954-), chairman of the Dr H.P. Heineken Foundation, the Dr A.H. Heineken Foundations and the C.L. de Carvalho-Heineken Foundation, which fund the prizes.

Heineken Prizes 2016 Winners

Five scientists awarded with prestigious Heineken Prizes 2016

The Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW) has awarded the 2016 Heineken Prizes to biochemist Jennifer Doudna (University of California), biologist Stephen (Steve) Jackson (University of Cambridge), ecologist Georgina Mace (University College London), historian Judith Herrin (King’s College London) and psychologist Elizabeth Spelke (Harvard University). The Heineken Prizes, amounting to USD 200,000 each, will be presented on 29 September 2016 in the Beurs van Berlage in Amsterdam.

Dr H.P. Heineken Prize for Biochemistry and Biophysics:
Jennifer Doudna
Jennifer Doudna, Professor of Biomedical Sciences at the University of California, Berkeley (US), will receive the 2016 Dr H.P. Heineken Prize for Biochemistry and Biophysics for her pioneering research into the structure and functioning of RNA molecules and RNA protein complexes.

Dr A.H. Heineken Prize for Medicine:
Stephen Jackson

Stephen (Steve) Jackson, Professor of Biology at the University of Cambridge (UK), will receive the 2016 Dr A.H. Heineken Prize for Medicine for his fundamental research into DNA repair in human cells and for the successful application of knowledge of that process in the development of new cancer drugs.

Dr A.H. Heineken Prize for Environmental Sciences:
Georgina Mace

Georgina Mace, Professor of Biodiversity and Ecosystems at University College London (UK), will receive the 2016 Dr A.H. Heineken Prize for Environmental Sciences for developing scientific criteria for the world’s most comprehensive list of threatened species and for establishing priorities for nature conservation.

Dr A.H. Heineken Prize for History:
Judith Herrin

Judith Herrin, Emeritus Professor of Late Antique and Byzantine Studies at King’s College London (UK), will receive the 2016 Dr A.H. Heineken Prize for History for her groundbreaking research into Medieval cultures in Mediterranean civilisations and for establishing the crucial significance of the Byzantine Empire in history.

C.L. de Carvalho-Heineken Prize for Cognitive Sciences:
Elizabeth Spelke

Elizabeth Spelke, Professor of Psychology at Harvard University, Cambridge (US), will receive the 2016 C.L. de Carvalho-Heineken Prize for Cognitive Sciences for her pioneering research into the cognitive development of infants.

Dr A.H. Heineken Prize for Art:
Yvonne Dröge Wendel

The Academy announced last month that the 2016 Dr A.H. Heineken Prize for Art will be awarded to visual artist Yvonne Dröge Wendel. Award ceremony The 2016 Heineken Prizes will be presented on 29 September 2016 during a special meeting of the Academy in the Beurs van Berlage in Amsterdam. At the same ceremony, five Heineken Young Scientists Awards will be presented to talented young researchers who, in the opinion of the jury, serve as an example to other researchers in their field.

About the Heineken Prizes
The Heineken Prizes are the largest international research prizes in the Netherlands and are awarded every other year. The winners are selected by juries consisting of leading international researchers put together by the Academy.

The Heineken Prizes amount to USD 200,000 each. The Heineken Prize for Art amounts to EUR 100,000, half of which must be spent on a publication or exhibition. There are also five Heineken Young Scientists Awards for young researchers. These prizes amount to EUR 10,000 each. These winners will be announced shortly.

The Heineken Prizes are named after Dr Henry P. Heineken (1886-1971); Dr Alfred H. Heineken (1923-2002) and Charlene de Carvalho-Heineken (1954), chair of the Dr H.P. Heineken Foundation and the Alfred Heineken Fondsen Foundation, which finance the Heineken Prizes. More information about the Heineken Prizes is available at KNAW website. Note for media representatives only: Media questions can be sent to Kim van den Wijngaard (KNAW), +31 20 551 0744, +31 6 1272 0479. High resolution photos of the laureates are available here.

Dr A.H. Heineken Prize for Art 2016 awarded to Yvonne Dröge Wendel

The international jury for the Dr A.H. Heineken Prize for Art has unanimously selected Dutch visual artist Yvonne Dröge Wendel as this year’s laureate. Dröge Wendel will receive a cash prize of EUR 100,000, half of which is meant to finance a publication and/or exhibition. The jury has praised Dröge Wendel’s work for its originality, inventiveness and vitality. The Dr A.H. Heineken Prize for Art is the Netherlands’ most prestigious prize for visual artists. It is financed from a private fund, the Dr A.H. Heineken Foundation for Art. The prize is being awarded for the fifteenth time this year. The award ceremony will take place on Thursday 29 September 2016 in Amsterdam.

For more information click here.

Call for nominations 2016

Nominations are now being accepted for the 2016 Heineken Prizes.

For more information click here.

Heineken Prizes 2014 Winners

Charlene de Carvalho-Heineken presents Heineken Prizes for Science and Art

Charlene de Carvalho-Heineken presented the Heineken Prizes for Science and Art this afternoon to Christopher Dobson, Wendelien van Oldenborgh, Kari Alitalo, Aleida Assmann, Jaap Sinninghe Damsté and James McClelland.

50th anniversary of Heineken Prizes
The prizes, which were presented at the Beurs van Berlage Building this afternoon in the presence of His Majesty King Willem Alexander of the Netherlands, were awarded for the first time fifty years ago. In her speech, Mrs De Carvalho spoke of the passion for science and art that led her father, Freddy Heineken, to establish the first Heineken Prizes. She herself added a prize for cognitive science and five Young Scientist Awards.

The Heineken Prizes have gained an impressive reputation worldwide. They are regarded as forerunners of the Nobel Prize; so far, fourteen Heineken laureates later became Nobel Prize winners.

From left: Wendelien van Oldenborgh, James McClelland, Jaap Sinninghe Damsté, Hans Clevers (president KNAW), Christopher Dobson, King Willem-Alexander, Kari Alitalo, Charlene de Carvalho-Heineken, Aleida Assmann (Photo Frank van Beek)

Christopher Dobson, University of Cambridge, winner of the Dr H.P. Heineken Prize for Biochemistry and Biophysics, is receiving the award (USD 200,000) for uncovering the manner in which proteins in the human body sometimes misfold themselves and how that process may lead to age-related diseases, including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and diabetes.

Video

Laudatio

Kari Alitalo, University of Helsinki, winner of the Dr A.H. Heineken Prize for Medicine, is receiving the award (USD 200,000) for his pioneering research into how and when lymphatic and blood vessels grow and how that knowledge can lead to better treatments for cancer and other diseases.

Video

Laudatio

Jaap Sinninghe Damsté, Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research/Utrecht University, winner of the Dr A.H. Heineken Prize for Environmental Sciences, is receiving the award (USD 200,000) for discovering and developing chemical fossils, which are helping us reconstruct the history of earth’s biosphere.

Video

Laudatio

Aleida Assmann, University of Konstanz, winner of the Dr A.H. Heineken Prize for History, is receiving the award (USD 200,000) for her contribution to the study of the ‘cultural memory’, i.e. how societies deal with their past through cultural expression, for example the news media, literature, the visual arts, music, buildings and monuments, and remembrance days.

Video

Laudatio

James McClelland, Stanford University, winner of the C.L. de Carvalho-Heineken Prize for Cognitive Science, is receiving the award (USD 200,000) for his important and fundamental contribution to the use of neural networks to model cognitive processes of the brain.

Video

Laudatio

Wendelien van Oldenborgh, visual artist, winner of the Dr A.H. Heineken Prize for Art, is receiving an award of EUR 100,000, half of which is intended to fund a publication and/or exhibition.

Video

Laudatio

Heineken Young Scientist Awards

At the same event, the five Heineken Young Scientist Awards (EUR 10,000 each) were presented to five young Dutch researchers.

From left: Rob Middag, Celia Berkers, Alexander Vlaar, King Willem-Alexander, Irene van Renswoude, Hans Clevers, Martin Vinck (Photo Frank van Beek)

Celia Berkers (33), Utrecht University, is receiving the Heineken Young Scientists Award for Biochemistry and Biophysics for her research into the workings of the proteasome, a structure that breaks down proteins in biological cells.

Alexander Vlaar (32), Academic Medical Centre in Amsterdam, is receiving the Heineken Young Scientists Award for Medicine for his research into acute lung injury as a side effect of blood transfusions in IC patients.

Rob Middag (30), University of Otago, New Zealand, is receiving the Heineken Young Scientists Award for Environmental Sciences for his field research into trace metals in oceans.

Irene van Renswoude (46), Huygens Institute for the History of the Netherlands, The Hague, is receiving the Heineken Young Scientists Award for History for her study of free speech in late antiquity and the early Middle Ages.

Martin Vinck (30), Yale University, USA, is receiving the Heineken Young Scientists Award for Cognitive Science for his research into the role of electrical oscillation in cognitive processes.

For more information, visit http://www.knaw.nl/heinekenprizes or contact Irene van Houten, +31 6 1137 5909.

Five exemplary researchers receive Heineken Young Scientists Awards

The Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW) has announced the names of five exemplary young researchers who will receive Heineken Young Scientists Awards in 2014.

The Academy’s juries, which earlier this month picked the winners of the Heineken Prizes, have awarded this year’s Heineken Young Scientists Awards to the following laureates working in similar research fields:

Celia Berkers, researcher at the Bijvoet Center for Biomolecular Research (Utrecht, Netherlands).
Dr C.R. Berkers (33) is receiving the 2014 Heineken Young Scientists Award for Biochemistry and Biophysics for her research into the workings of the proteasome, a structure that breaks down proteins in biological cells.

Alexander Vlaar, researcher at the Academic Medical Centre (Amsterdam, Netherlands).
Dr A.P.J. Vlaar (32) is receiving the 2014 Heineken Young Scientists Award for Medicine for his research into acute lung injury, a serious side effect of blood transfusions in IC patients.

Rob Middag, researcher at the University of Otago (Dunedin, New Zealand).
Dr R. Middag (30) is receiving the 2014 Heineken Young Scientists Award for Environmental Sciences for his highly productive research into trace metals in the world’s oceans.

Irene van Renswoude, researcher at the Huygens Institute for the History of the Netherlands (The Hague, Netherlands).
Dr I. van Renswoude (46) is receiving the 2014 Heineken Young Scientists Award for History for her research into the freedom of expression in late Antiquity and the early Middle Ages.

Martin Vinck, researcher at Yale University (New Haven, USA).
Dr M. Vinck (30) is receiving the 2014 Heineken Young Scientists Award for Cognitive Science for his research into the role of electrical oscillation in cognitive processes.

Awards ceremony

The 2014 Heineken Young Scientists Awards will be presented on Thursday 2 October 2014 during a special meeting of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences at the Beurs van Berlage Building in Amsterdam. The Heineken Prizes will be presented there as well.

About the Heineken Young Scientists Awards

The Heineken Young Scientists Awards are meant as an encouragement for young and talented researchers. The Awards are presented at the same time as the Heineken Prizes. The winners are promising young researchers whose achievements set an example for other young scientists. They conduct their research in the same disciplines as the Heineken Prize winners. The Young Scientists Award consists of a piece of sculpture by Jeroen Henneman, an artist based in Amsterdam, and EUR 10,000.

About the Heineken Prizes

The prestigious Dr H.P Heineken Prize for Biochemistry and Biophysics was introduced fifty years ago, in 1964. Later, it was joined by other Heineken Prizes: the Dr A.H. Heineken Prize for Art (1988), Medicine (1989), Environmental Sciences (1990) and History (1990), and the C.L. de Carvalho-Heineken Prize for Cognitive Science (introduced in 2006 and formerly known as the Dr A.H. Heineken Prize for Cognitive Science).

The Heineken Prizes were initiated by Dr Alfred H. Heineken (1923-2002) in honour of his father (Dr Henry P. Heineken, 1886-1971) and continued by his daughter, Charlene de Carvalho-Heineken (1954). Mrs De Carvalho is Chair of the Dr H.P. Heineken Foundation and the Alfred Heineken Fondsen Foundation, which fund all the Heineken Prizes.

The Heineken Prizes and the Heineken Young Scientists Awards are awarded every two years. The winners are selected by juries composed of members of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences.

The Heineken Prizes are $200,000 each. The Heineken Prize for Art is €100,000, of which €50,000 is to be spent on a publication or exhibition. The Heineken Young Scientists Awards are €10,000 each.

Heineken Prizes 2014 Winners

Five scientists awarded prestigious Heineken Prizes 2014

The Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW) has announced the names of five internationally renowned scientists who have been awarded prestigious Heineken Prizes (one million US dollars prize money in total). The laureates receive the Heineken Prizes for their great merits to science.

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the first Heineken Prize, awarded to the Austrian-American chemist Erwin Chargaff in 1964.

KNAW juries have awarded this year’s Heineken Prizes to the following laureates:

Christopher M. Dobson, John Humphrey Plummer Professor of Chemical and Structural Biology, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom).
Prof. Dobson has been awarded the Dr H.P. Heineken Prize for Biochemistry and Biophysics 2014 for uncovering the way in which proteins in the human body sometimes misfold themselves and how that process may lead to age-related diseases including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and diabetes.

Kari Alitalo, Academy Professor for the Molecular Biology of Cancer at the Academy of Finland in Helsinki (Finland).
Prof. Alitalo has been awarded the Dr A.H. Heineken Prize for Medicine 2014 for his pioneering research on how and when lymph and blood vessels grow, and how that knowledge could help us find interventions to treat cancer and other diseases.

Jaap Sinninghe Damsté, Professor of Organic Geochemistry at Utrecht University (Netherlands).
Prof. Sinninghe Damsté has been awarded the Dr A.H. Heineken Prize for Environmental Sciences 2014 for his tremendous contributions to the discovery and development of ‘chemical fossiles’, which help us reconstruct the history of the earth’s biosphere.

Aleida Assmann, Professor of English Literature at the University of Konstanz (Germany).
Prof. Assmann has been awarded the Dr A.H. Heineken Prize for History 2014 for her large and ground breaking contributions to studies of ‘cultural memory’ and how societies deal with their past through cultural expressions: news media, literature, visual arts, music, buildings and monuments, remembrance days.

James McClelland, Director of the Center for Mind, Brain, and Computation at the University of Stanford (United States).
Prof. McLelland has been awarded the C.L. de Carvalho-Heineken Prize for Cognitive Science 2014 for his important and fundamental contributions to the use of neural networks to model cognitive processes of the brain.

The awarding of the Dr A.H. Heineken Prize for Art 2014 to Dutch artist Wendelien van Oldenborgh was announced by the KNAW last March.

Award ceremony

De Heineken Prizes 2014 will be presented on Thursday 2 October 2014 at a special meeting of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences in the Beurs van Berlage in Amsterdam.
Heineken Young Scientists Awards will be presented at that occasion as well to five talented young researchers whose work may serve as an example to other young scientists and scholars.

About the Heineken Prizes

Fifty years ago, in 1964, the prestigious Dr H.P Heineken Prize for Biochemistry and Biophysics was introduced. In later years, more Heineken Prizes were added: the Dr A.H. Heineken Prize for Art (1988), Medicine (1989), Environmental Sciences (1990) and History (1990), and the C.L. de Carvalho-Heineken Prize for Cognitive Science (2006).

The Heineken Prizes are named after Dr Henry P. Heineken (1886-1971), Heineken’s second director, Dr Alfred H. Heineken (1923-2002), Chairman of Heineken NV’s board of directors, and Charlene de Carvalho-Heineken (1954), Chair of the Dr H.P. Heineken Foundation and the Alfred Heineken Fondsen Foundation, which fund all the Heineken Prizes.

Heineken Prizes are awarded every two years. The winners are selected by juries composed of members of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences.
The scientific Heineken Prizes are $200,000 each. The Heineken Prize for Art is €100,000, of which €50,000 is to be spent on a publication or exhibition. Young Scientists Awards are €10,000 each.

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For the editors

The Royal Academy website has more information about the Heineken Prizes [www.knaw.nl/heinekenprizes]

If you have questions about the Heineken Prizes, please contact Helena van Oers (Royal Academy), +31 20 551 0863 or helena.van.oers@knaw.nl

Wendelien van Oldenborgh receives
Dr A.H. Heineken Prize for Art 2014

The Netherlands’ largest prize for artists, the Dr A.H. Heineken Prize for Art, will be awarded to Wendelien van Oldenborgh in 2014. Funded by the Alfred Heineken Fondsen Foundation, the prize itself is EUR 50,000; in addition, the prize-winner may spend the same amount to produce a publication and/or arrange an exhibition.

According to the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, which awards the biennial prize, Van Oldenborgh’s work occupies a unique position in the Dutch artistic landscape. Van Oldenborgh will receive the prize along with the five winners of the Heineken Prizes for Science and the five winners of the Heineken Young Scientists Awards on Thursday 2 October 2014 during a special award ceremony at the Beurs van Berlage Building in Amsterdam.

Wendelien van Oldenborgh’s work consists of multi-level projects in which footage or still photographs shot at iconic locations (for example the Golden Hall of the Mauritshuis Royal Picture Gallery in The Hague or the Music Centre of the Netherlands Public Broadcasting Organisation in Hilversum) are projected as part of a carefully arranged installation. Her work addresses current, socially relevant themes such as migration, the Netherlands’ colonial past, and subcultures. According to the Academy’s jury, what sets her work apart from other leading Dutch artists is the unique way in which she tackles social themes and creates scope for the individual voices, spaces and relationships that constitute the invisible and sometimes confusing subtext of our mediatised reality. Without resorting to spectacle, Van Oldenborgh forces us to look at who and what we are.

Wendelien van Oldenborgh (born in 1962) studied at Goldsmiths College, London. Before settling in Rotterdam, she lived and worked in Germany and Belgium. In addition to her artistic work, she teaches various Master’s degree courses, including at the Dutch Art Institute/ArtEZ (Master of Fine Arts) and the Royal Academy of Art (Artistic Research Master’s programme). She previously received the Hendrik Chabot Prize for Fine Arts (2011) and the Marian McMahon Award (2010).

Dr A.H. Heineken Prize for Art
Alfred Heineken’s deep commitment to art led him to establish the Dr A.H. Heineken Prize for Art (1988). It is one of six Heineken Prizes for Science and Art and five Heineken Young Scientists Awards presented every other year by the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences. In 2014, it will be fifty years ago that the Dr H.P. Heineken Prize for Biochemistry and Biophysics was awarded for the first time. In addition to this and the Dr A.H. Heineken Prize for Art, the other prizes are the Dr A.H. Heineken Prize for Medicine, the Dr A.H. Heineken Prize for History, the Dr A.H. Heineken Prize for Environmental Sciences, and the C.L. de Carvalho-Heineken Prize for Cognitive Science. The total sum awarded to the prize-winners in the fields of science and scholarship is USD 1 million; the prize for art is EUR 100,000 euro (EUR 50,000 of which is intended for a publication and/or exhibition). The six Heineken Prizes are funded by the Dr H.P. Heineken Foundation and Alfred Heineken Fondsen Foundation, which also fund the five Heineken Young Scientists Awards in the same fields. Each of the latter awards is worth EUR 10,000.

For the editors
The Royal Academy website has more information about Wendelien van Oldenborgh and the Heineken Prizes in general. There is also a separate Heineken Prizes website.

The Academy will announce the winners of the five Heineken Prizes for Science around 15 April 2014.

If you have questions about the Heineken Prizes, please contact Helena van Oers (Royal Academy), +31 20 551 0863 or helena.van.oers@knaw.nl